Write Project Scope Document Everything You need to Know

A Project Scope Document is a crucial element every Project Manager needs to learn! Is your project dragged down by scope creep’s slowly expanding deliverables?

According to a survey by PMI (Project Management Institute), nearly 50% of projects experience scope creep. Having a document like this can save on those increased expenses and the risk of missed deadlines.

That’s exactly why we need a document in place!

Before mapping out your project requirements, you’d want a clear idea of what needs to be done and all that is completed.

Let’s check how a document can keep you and your team on the right track.

A Project Scope documents a part of the project plan that details “WHAT” work must be done. It outlines the functions, features, and deliverables of the project work.

This scope document is specially curated for those who need present or future references for your project. It’s usually a lengthy bunch of pages that includes almost everything the project entails.

The document requires inputs from stakeholders, subject matter experts, end-users, sponsors, and so on.

Project Managers are the ones who are aware of the needs, challenges, and capabilities of diverse groups from multiple teams. This is the reason, why Project managers are the main point of contact for writing the scope of work document.

  • As we mentioned earlier, this document clearly cuts down and prevents the unwanted time spent due to scope creep.
  • It also serves as a reminder for quick reference if someone goes astray from the plan.
  • If accounting for lost time is something on our minds, this project document is your go-to friend, as no one needs to question irrelevant details.

What should a Project Scope Document include?

You want to make sure the document looks professional. This document is reviewed by your supervisor, your team, and the client.

You cannot miss the critical elements of this document.

The document must include:

  • Overall Project goals
  • Description of Project
  • Assumptions & Exclusions
  • Cost & Budget
  • Major deliverables
  • Constraints
  • Final Agreement

Jot down each goal with the end in mind. You may want to note down the highlights of the discussion.

You could also explain where the funding is coming from and who is going to support that goal.

You’d want to focus on specific tasks within these goals to hit the target you’ve set.

When you look at the deliverable, you should be able to immediately figure out what it means and how you’ll present it to the client.

The deliverables are accepted as a result of this strategy.

Make sure to include the length, format, colors, and styles, as well as any other information provided by the customer. The deliverable will be accepted as a result of this strategy.

You’ll wind up with uncertainty, missing expectations, and project issues that aren’t expressed.

If you work for a consulting firm that charges external clients for its services, you’ll want to break out project costs at the phase or milestone level.

The more transparent you can be about expenses and the effort involved, the easier it will be to control them — and to make a case for more funding when new scope emerges.

It’s always wise to list up all the assumptions and exclusions that can affect the results you’ve anticipated.

Once we discuss the specific milestones, we can ascertain how much each of them will cost.

This will help you analyze the budget spend and what will you be doing for the client. Make sure the client knows what they’re spending for, is worth the spend, and fits their budget.

Costs depend on what kind of business you’re working for.

For charging clients, you’ll want to break out project costs at the phase or milestone level.

It’s best to be transparent about expenses and the effort involved in controlling them further.

This includes a list of all of the project’s deliverables. Avoid misunderstandings by laying down the approval presentation during the project, as well as the end deliverable.

Constraints are limitations of a project like a scope, quality, budget, schedule, or resources.

They’re known as triple constraints. These limitations are established at the start of your project. You must also work within their limits.

Once you create the document, it’s time for the final send-off to your customer. The final agreement must be sent and approved before creating a project plan and commencing the project.

After all, you wouldn’t want to get an incorrect requirement and start over.

Since scope-related queries crop up throughout the project phase, it’s better to preserve this document somewhere safe.

The absence of a single project work document impacts an entire project. This document protects your team from confusion about the project process.

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